Haiti

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  • Clinic1
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  • Clinic5
  • Coordinating food distribution at double harvest
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  • Doctors and nurses providing care
  • Double harvest- a request was made for a commode- made on site
  • Double harvest- bringing patients by any means to the clinic

After establishing the first DOUBLE HARVEST agricultural development project in Indonesia in 1968 and a small farm project in Honduras near Lake de Yojoa with Andre Vandenberg in 1975, Aart van Wingerden determined to go to Haiti, the poorest country in the western hemisphere. In 1978 Aart went to visit Haiti with his son Len and Tom Bolton, a farmer and neighbor, whose father had been Ambassador to Haiti. Extensive reconnaissance was done in the Plaine du Cul-de Sac area. The towns of Bon Repos, Cazeau, Croix des Bouquets, Monet and Thomazeau were visited with Cazeau being selected to serve as the first base of operations for DOUBLE HARVEST in Haiti.

Port-au-Prince, Haiti The Plaine du Cul-de-Sac
Port-au-Prince, Haiti The Plaine du Cul-de-Sac
Treeless slopes Severe erosion
Treeless slopes Severe erosion

The sad reality of Haiti is its environmental and ecological abuses of the natural resources once so abundant. It seems inconceivable that more than ninety percent of Haiti was once a tropical oasis two hundred years ago. Today deforestation, soil erosion and use of wood to make charcoal for cooking continue to exacerbate an already desperate ecological catastrophe. The agricultural sector is underdeveloped, governmental interest nonexistent and the low productivity of subsistence farming perpetuates a depressing poverty. The bulk of the foodstuffs are imported and there is widespread malnutrition and hunger in Haiti.

Under water, tens of thousands homeless The destructive power of water
Under water, tens of thousands homeless The destructive power of water

The hurricane of 2004 struck Haiti’s historic port of Cap-Haitien killing an estimated 3,000 people. In 2008 four hurricanes hit around the city of Gonaives killing almost a 1,000 people and leaving a million homeless. The rains associated with these hurricanes caused enormous erosion, mudslides and havoc on the denuded mountainsides adding to the ecological disaster prevalent over all of Haiti.

The most asked for and appreciated - clean drinking water Relief efforts in a fishing village
The most asked for and appreciated - clean drinking water Relief efforts in a fishing village

DOUBLE HARVEST is in Haiti for the long haul and has undertaken a variety of projects outside of its core mission of agricultural development to help with critical needs as we are confronted by desperate situations.

Tens of thousands homeless Destruction in a local village
Tens of thousands homeless Destruction in a local village

The catastrophic earthquake of January 12, 2010 with over 230,000 people killed and millions left homeless has greatly increased the need for providing medical treatment thru DOUBLE HARVEST Clinic and will require a tremendous effort for home reconstruction. There has been a renewed understanding of the fundamental need to address Haiti’s abysmal agricultural economy and urgent need to reforest the mountains. We will continue to press our agricultural endeavors with greater urgency to help bring about a doubling of the harvest.

Doing it the right way New home going up
Doing it the right way New home going up